feedback

I had some feedback from nurses on my home unit—I need to put together a critical-care basics course to teach some things we all had in human physiology or pharmacology, but have forgotten. For those new to critical care, I offer this as explanation:

There is an assumed body of knowledge within the ICU, an unspoken tradition of ways and means and facts. Some standard acute-care traditions: full moons mean a busy night, always draw a type & screen and make a patient NPO if surgery has been scheduled for the morning, give the meds scheduled for 8, 9, and 10 all at 9, always hang the fastest-infusing antibiotic first.

In the ICU we have our traditions, too. Traditions like always know who’s on call for all the specialties (determines whether you call or wait), when you get report on a post-surgical patient always ask who ran the gas (will you need to have fluids hanging to infuse or will you have time to prime), weebles wobble but they don’t fall down (#teamneuro).

Respond in the comments, either on Facebook or A Tangled Web. What’s basic knowledge to you? What do you need to remind you of the basics?

Author: Mitochondrial Eve

ICU RN ~ CCRN ~ CMC ~ CSC I know less than half as much as I'd like to, and say more than half as much as I should.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s